Quince may not be celebrated similar to ume (plum blossoms) or sakura (cherry blossoms). But this thorny vibrant-red flower is as popular in Asian poetry and paintings. In Japanese arts and literature, this flower symbolises love and sincerity. It welcomes the spring season with vibrant red; dainty pink; or elegant white.

The Japanese Quince is on my list of materials that I want to have in my Ikebana this year. For some reason, it is vert rare to see them in the flower shops in our area. Maybe because this plant is a hand-me-down kind and not really available for sale. Hence the moment I saw this flower at my usual flower shop, I immediately both a couple of stems. It was like finding a special candy inside a huge sweet shop.

Japanese Quince in Ikebana

I was so happy when I got a few good stems of the Japanese Quince a few weeks ago. They were tall enough for the arrangements I want to make but not too lengthy for our small corners. The stems are hardy which is good as I practice with the bending and cutting techniques.

For my first arrangement, I complemented the Quince with yellow mustard flowers for an early spring arrangement. I also added few Spirea stems at the bottom to intensify the curvy lines.

Quince in Ikebana
Japanese Quince and Mustard Flowers

Then I also complemented the vibrant red flowers with dark pink Tulips and light pink Sweet Peas. The arrangement is in a tall vase with a painting of mountains on it. The stems were arranged as if they are flowers are on top of the mountains.

Welcoming Spring with Quince, Tulips, and Sweet Peas

After a couple weeks, I noticed that the flowers are still in good condition. The colors have faded a bit turning the petals from bright red to peachy orange. Last Tuesday, I created my third arrangement using the same material. I combined the stems with bright orange Calendula to add vibrancy.

Calendula and Japanese Quince