Flowers and Ikebana

3-in1 Ikebana: Before They Were Three, Now They Are One

It was my first time to try creating a 3-in-1 Ikebana arrangement. As I go on with my training as an Ikebana sensei, I try to focus on improving my weak areas such as making arrangements without using kenzan; and using unconventional materials. For yesterday’s special lesson with my sensei, I again tried to challenge myself by making arrangements using tall vases. They call this as Nagaire  wherein materials are arranged in a tall cylindrical vase without using kenzan or the spiky frog.  I always have a hard time making a Nagaire arrangement because placing the materials in certain degree or angle  is very delicate; if one flower or stem moves, the whole arrangement is busted. After more than 40 arrangements, I somehow manage to control my materials but I am still not that comfortable.

3-in-1 Ikebana: Three Individual Arrangements as One Composition 

To add more to the challenge, I tried to create three individual arrangements that will look unified when they are placed together.  Doing so, I refrained myself from placing the vases side-by-side so that I can focus on one particular vase. However, when I finished doing my second and third arrangements, I put them together from time to time to see if the three blend well. My sensei said that this method is a bit difficult but she was glad that my work turned out great.

First arrangement using the colors of orange, pink. and white in a cylindrical vase carved with gold plum
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Second arrangement in blue and pink placed in a dark green vase carved with gold bamboo
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Third arrangement using orange, pink and white colors placed in the same dark green vase designed with gold pine tree
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Three different arrangements combined into one using the Shochikutai vases (pine, bamboo, plum) which means prosperity, resilience, and beauty



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