Hachiko is popular to most people for its loyalty to its master. Its story inspired both the dog lovers and non-lovers around the world especially when Richard Gere made a movie about him. When in Tokyo, locals and tourists queue to have a photo with its bronze statue in Shibuya. Living in Tokyo gave me a great opportunity to have several encounters with this iconic dog over the years.

 

Hachiko Discoveries in Tokyo

I first learned about Hachiko from an old anime or cartoon. I may not be a big fan of dogs, but its cuteness and character caught my attention at that time. Watching the cartoon was like watching a love story. Several years after, I found myself taking a photo beside its infamous statue in front of Shibuya Station. It was one of my must-do-things when I first came to Japan in 2008.

Hachiko
Bronze statue of Hachiko in Shibuya

 

Our tête-à-tête continued when I visited the National Museum of Nature and Science in Ueno sometime in 2014. Inside the museum is its mounted remains.

 

The stuffed Hachiko inside the National Museum of Nature and Science, Ueno

 

And this year, my encounter with this faithful dog has reached its full cycle.  Last Sunday, I finally had the chance to see the latest memorabilia of Hachiko. This time, he is no longer alone. He is now reunited with his master, Dr. Ueno Hidesaburo. Unlike the one in Shibuya, their statues stand quietly on the grounds of Tokyo University Yayoi Campus where Dr. Ueno worked as an agricultural scientist.

 

Reunited with his master, Dr. Ueno